Connect with us

SGEF2017

Scoonews Global Education Awards 2017 – Recognising inspiring individuals, schools and companies, who have made a difference in education

The incredibly inspiring fest concluded with the Scoonews Global Education Awards. The annual Scoonews Global Education Awards recognise exceptional educators, teachers, education technology companies and startups working in the global education arena. Scoonews constituted 45 categories…

Published

on

Scoonews Global Educators Fest 2017 brought together some of the best educators from across the globe to #unconference and brainstorm their ideas and practices. The programme which lasted over two days at the Hyatt Regency, Gurgaon from August 18-19th was home to some of the best speakers, pioneers in the field of education, who shared their insights on varied topics ranging from the ‘future of learning’ to the ‘dignity of labour’.

The incredibly inspiring fest concluded with the Scoonews Global Education Awards. The annual Scoonews Global Education Awards recognise exceptional educators, teachers, education technology companies and startups working in the global education arena. Scoonews constituted 45 categories for the awards. These awards were created to raise awareness and bring to limelight outstanding work being done in the field of education, worldwide.

Bringing together individuals,schools, start-ups and unique companies that are making contributions to the cause of education, the awards aim to recognise their work and showcae it to the world. The award categories were thoughtfully cherry-picked to recognise schools and individuals who are soaring ahead in their own fields, be it by using cutting edge technology or by going green!

The awards were given to their recipients by Prince Lakshyaraj Singh of Mewar, Prof. Sugata Mitra, Ted prize winner and Professor Newcastle University, Mr Ravi Santlani, CEO-Scoonews and Mr Bahul Chandra, Co-founder Scoonews.

The complete list of the winners and the categories they won in is provided below:

Advertisement

Category

Name

 Best Academia And Industry collaborator

Adi Shankara Institute of Engineering and Technology, Kalady

 Digital Content Of The Year-K12 Education

Smartclass Educational Services Pvt. Ltd.

Advertisement

 Distinguished Performance In Academics

PRELUDE PUBLIC SCHOOL

 Emerging E-Learning Startup Of The Year

Fliplearn Education Pvt. Ltd.

 Emerging STEM Solution

Addy's International

Advertisement

 Exceptional In Co-Curricular Activities

Mussoorie International School

 Exceptional In Co-Curricular Activities (Editor's Choice)

MODERN DEFENCE SR. SEC. SCHOOL, JAIPUR

 Incomparable School Infrastructure

THE ASSAM VALLEY SCHOOL

Advertisement

 Incomparable School Infrastructure (Editor's Choice)

DASS & BROWN WORLD SCHOOL

 Integration Of Holistic Development In Education

VIBGYOR Group of schools

 Outstanding Commitment To Sports

Young Scholars (YS) Public School

Advertisement

 Outstanding Contribution In Education And Training

EON REALITY PTE LTD

 Phenomenal Implementation In Pedagogy

The Heritage School

 Phenomenal Implementation In Pedagogy (Editor's Choice)

DCM PRESIDENCY SCHOOL

Advertisement

 Phenomenal Implementation In Pedagogy, North

Patanjali Rishikul, Allahabad

 Private University of The Year

THE ICFAI FOUNDATION FOR HIGHER EDUCATION

 Standalone School Of The Year 2016-2017

Nehru World School

Advertisement

 Standalone School Of The Year 2016-2017 (Editor's Choice)

JBCN INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL, PAREL

 Standalone School Of The Year 2016-2017 (North)

SUBODH PUBLIC SCHOOL, AIRPORT, JAIPUR

 Emerging Education Outsourcing Company

NCR Eduservices Pvt. Ltd

Advertisement

Best Use of Ed Tech in School

Modern Public School

Creative School of the Year Award

Rockwood School

Emerging Pre-School of the Year Award

Papagoya Education Pvt Ltd

Advertisement

Emerging Pre-School of the Year Award (Editor's Choice)

YOUNGIN International

Emerging School Of The Year

Seth M.R Jaipuria Schools

Emerging School Of The Year (North)

Delhi Public School , Greater Faridabad

Advertisement

Emerging School Of The Year (South)

MOUNT LITERA ZEE SCHOOL

Emerging School Of The Year (West)

S. V. PUBLIC SCHOOL, JAIPUR

Exceptional Infrastructure Of The Year

THE EMERALD HEIGHTS INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL

Advertisement

Green School Of The Year Award

Sanjay Ghodawat International School, Kolhapur

Green School Of The Year Award (Editor's Choice)

JBCN INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL, BORIVALI

Impressive Infrastructure In Early Education

SAPLINGS

Advertisement

Innovative And Creative Literacy Award

ALLENHOUSE PUBLIC SCHOOL

Playschool Chain of the Year Award

Petals Pre School

Principal Of The Year

Dr. Nripen Kumar Dutta

Advertisement

Promoting Children’s Health and Wellbeing Award

Intellitots Early Learning Centre

Secondary School of the Year (Community impact)

The Divine International School

Secondary School of the Year (Innovative Practices)

Gurukul The School, NH-24

Advertisement

Secondary School of the Year (overall)

THE SANSKAAR VALLEY SCHOOL, BHOPAL

Skill Development Enhancement Programmes In Schools

The Geekay World School

Skill Development Initiative of the year in Higher Education

Adi Shankara Institute of Engineering and Technology, Kalady

Advertisement

Spirit Of Enterprise Award

MET Rishikul Vidyalaya

Spirit Of Enterprise Award (Editor's Choice)

The Jaipuria School

Standalone Pre-school of the Year Award

Shri Ram Foundation Pre School

Advertisement

Supporting Parents to Build Their Capacity and Confidence Award

Skill-eD

Please use this link to view and download the pics of #SGEA2017

https://1drv.ms/f/s!Au6LxMjCRD8IhJcte8dIz4bj_5xV-A

Advertisement

SGEF2017

Curriculum specialist Rashenah Walker on the exciting future ahead, in an exclusive at SGEF 2017

“It helps to go into the classroom and know what works with the children and what works with the teacher so that I know that something is perfect or whether something needs to be redesigned”, says Rashenah Walker, Curriculum specialist

Published

on

How do you assess the effectiveness of a curriculum?
Assessing the effectiveness of a curriculum includes many components, starting with the need to know what type of curriculum you are dealing with, whether it is American or British curriculum or Indian curriculum. You should make sure that the teachers know what the standards are and what the objectives are that you want the students to know. What I suggest is that you need to start backwards and work your way forward. First figure out what’s the end outcome. After you finish a lesson or a unit, what do you want your students to know and, from there, work your way backwards. How are you going to get the students to know this? What activities are you going to get them to do and what is going to be the assessment? Once you figure out the ‘how’, the actual implementation is so much easier.

Since you have designed curriculum for many countries, what type of curriculum do children learn best from?
The curriculum doesn’t matter. What matters is the process that you are going through and that you have varied instruction, so that you present it in so many different ways. Something that I have noticed in the International schools is that they have many teachers who have no training or a teaching license. They have not gone to school, they don’t have pedagogy. So it is kind of like they are just thrown in the profession. But the truth is teaching is a difficult profession. Just like how a doctor cannot work without formal training, a teacher cannot do justice to the profession without formal training. But the good thing is in teaching you will see people from diverse backgrounds – I’ve known IT specialists, engineers, people who have worked in the military, who have transitioned into teaching. So they have a different perspective that they can bring into the profession. But the problem is when it comes to curriculum, they are not sure how to take what’s on paper and put it in real life. They don’t know how to take what’s on paper and communicate it to a small mind. I know that the British curriculum is easy to work with because it’s already readymade, so it is not much for the teacher to do. It is literally like open a book; a lot of resources are already pre-made. But the American curriculum is so diverse. You have the standards but we don’t care how a student learns a noun or a pronoun as long as they learn it. It can be great for a creative teacher that says, ‘Oh wow, we are going to play this game’ or ‘We are going to do this activity’, or ‘We’re going to try this experiment’. But if there is a new teacher who doesn’t have a background in teaching, they won’t know how to teach what a noun or a pronoun is. But that’s the great thing about teaching. It can be so diverse and you can do it any way that you want. But at the same time, if you don’t have the support needed for the teachers, it can be an absolute disaster.

Do you interact with kids while designing curriculum?

Yes, I do. I love the kids. I go into the classroom and I love seeing them learn and I love seeing them play. So that’s the positive but I also have to see how the curriculum is working because maybe I’ll look at something and I’ll have an idea in my head. But working with International schools, it is very difficult when you are dealing with second language learners and what their culture allows. Working in the Middle East, of course you have a strong Islamic culture and a strong local culture. If you are looking at an American curriculum school, one of the most common things that we teach in high school is Romeo and Juliet. That is such a die-hard story and everybody knows it but we can’t teach Romeo and Juliet (in the Middle East) because it is a love story and the two don’t get married and that’s against Islam. So I have to find another story to teach the skill of analysing the story and its characters. It does help to know the students and the base that I’m dealing with, so I can figure out their skills and provide support accordingly. It helps to go into the classroom and know what works with the children and what works with the teacher so that I know that something is perfect or whether something needs to be redesigned.

Did you ever get a chance to work with the Indian education system?

Advertisement

I have not. They do have Indian schools in Dubai and actually they are some of the best performing schools in Dubai. I’m not sure why but clearly, you guys are doing something good with the curriculum! (laughs) It’s always been something that I’ve been interested in because I want to know why they are some of the best performing schools and how the students are able to perform so well. I don’t know if it has to do with the home base. Maybe this is an expectation from home while other parents say ‘Just do your best, whatever that is’. For example, if you’re a D student and that’s your best, ‘Good job’! But for some families, your ‘best’ is not good enough. It is something that I’m interested in researching and looking at schools and finding what works there and figuring out how that can be implemented in other schools’ systems and curriculum.

How did you get into curriculum designing?

It’s a strange job and what makes it a little bit different here or in the Middle East or any international markets for education versus in the United States is that in the States you never see them. They are always at the board or at the county level, so they never actually come into the schools and see what’s happening. They work remotely and they only have the standards and they put together activities, objectives and that’s it. And all you see is a piece of paper when you go to work at a school. But here what I love is I get to see the interaction, what is working and what is not. I get to go to other schools, I get to give them ideas as to how to change their curriculum and design it in a better way. You can see the teachers, you can see how the students are interacting to it and you can see what’s working. Like I said, in the Middle East, we have to change a lot of the content to make it culturally sensitive. But even with that, when you are dealing with second language learners, you have to look at the curriculum as a whole.
If it’s the American curriculum, you are using American books. So there are some stories that have a certain vernacular, a certain tone which you would understand only if you are American. So when you are looking at resources, you have to find books that fit the students’ ability to understand and grasp the ideas. The student should not just be able to read but also understand it. So when I’m in a classroom, I understand exactly what a child understands whereas if you are at a county level, you never know what’s happening!

Have you designed curriculum for children with special needs?

Yes, I have. Actually, my certification in the States is with special education. I’ve worked with special education kids for about six years. When you look at special education, it’s not that a child is ‘dumb’ or ‘slow’ – they learn ‘differently’. It’s almost like a puzzle. It is my job to figure out how they learn. It doesn’t matter if they need extra time, maybe they need to be told in a different way, maybe it needs to be repeated multiple times, maybe instead of taking a traditional test, they take it in a different way. They may give oral responses or they are able to do it on the computer.

SGEF 2017 – Enlightening!

Advertisement

Honestly, I was very surprised. I don’t know anything about the Indian education system and I wanted to see what’s happening here, what’s new, where are you guys in the process as far as educational design is concerned. I can see exactly where you are in the process. It’s definitely going through reform. I see that there is a huge interest in it and that you have so many things up and coming. I’m really excited about the next five years, about what’s going to come up here. I love the forum because it’s a place where everybody can come and share ideas and I love how they had one of the executives from the Board and all the teachers are so excited just to put their input in and he was excited to listen to what’s happening in all the different states. You had Prof. Sugata Mitra known for the Hole in the Wall experiment. I did not know it was him when I first saw him and then when he got up on stage I was like, “Oh my God, that’s him!” because I actually used his video to train some of my teachers in Dubai – the idea of letting go as a teacher and letting the kids explore and discover on their own. It was amazing to see him here. Also it was enlightening to listen to the perspective of someone from the Board and someone from the classroom. You are going through the process of reform that most countries are. Whether to get the expensive book or to get a cheaper one, do they have the same content, how do you choose etc… I’m glad that the problems are being recognised and steps are being taken to solve them.

This story appeared in the September 2017 issue of ScooNews magazine.

Continue Reading

SGEF2017

Fatema Agarkar, co-founder, KA EduAssociates on the need for teacher training as the core priority for leadership teams at SGEF 2017

Children are more intelligent, are more exposed, more evolved and know that much more than we do. We cannot claim to know what their future is going to be like. One thing is certain: it’s going to be different from how our world was. Perhaps we can claim that ours was easier.

Published

on

We have gone through a lot on this day, lots of ideas, lots of speakers and we are all speaking the same language, we all have the same findings, we are all talking in a collective space where we all agree. However there is work that still needs to be done, and through this presentation I promise you that we will be able to create a few disruptions which the ‘unconference’ started talking about. As an educator, when I attend conferences or ‘unconferences’ like SGEF, I want to take stock of the industry. What have we done, where have we reached and where do we want to go?

This gets me to three important truths and, luckily for me, all the other speakers have spoken about them. By default Geeta (Dharmarajan) mentioned that children are more intelligent, are more exposed, more evolved and know that much more than we do. We cannot claim to know what their future is going to be like. One thing is certain: it’s going to be different from how our world was. Perhaps we can claim that ours was easier. Let’s get this discussion on technology over and done with once and for all. It is here to stay, let’s work this out.

Do we really know what our children know? Or do we go into those classrooms and simply teach? And I’m not talking about multiple intelligence, I’m not talking about differentiation or about learning styles. I’m talking about do we know what they know? If the future is so unexplored, then everyone in this room agrees that we have no idea what the future is going to be like, what on earth are we preparing these kids for and simply why bother?

As I attempted to answer some of these questions, there were some harsh realities and I hope you come into some logical conclusions as well. We simply, as an industry, keep talking about what we should teach, how we should teach. We don’t even answer the fundamental question: what do they know in that classroom? I think Sugata (Mitra) pointed that out and Valentina (Trivedi) spoke about the joy of learning. We should know what they know but we do very little to find out. Are we really skilled? If we were not brought up in their generation, how do we know what they are thinking? Are we giving them enough to create? I think that was (APJ Abdul) Kalam sa’ab’s vision and we are all proud Indians here and I know the one thing he told me when I met him was, ‘You create happy children, will they duplicate or will they create?’ That’s a question we have to ask and that’s the harsh reality that none of us seem to face.

Is there sustained learning? As a young company attempting to rethink, attempting to re-engineer, attempting to say ‘Hey listen, we know a lot of stuff, we don’t know what to do with it because we keep discussing it and it’s still not implementable’. We said, ‘Let’s borrow from the corporate world once in a while; they seem to talk about it all the time, let’s put it into practice in our industry’.

Advertisement

Some radical propositions for you… Imagine Grade 3 and 4 students with one textbook in their hand. Why not Harry Potter? Isn’t that a world of super heroes and isn’t that the age that everyone likes magic and mystery? ‘One textbook for the whole year? How will we charge the parents?’ some of the promotors might ask. One textbook is possible. ‘Hole in the Wall’ was just that. You can teach history, geography, beautiful landscapes to work with, math, science, what better way to get them into the chemistry lab and getting them to experiment with proportions and potions! You can teach vocabulary, grammar and context and all the lovely jargon that we love to use in our conferences. You can teach them to write. My co-founder will always talk about effective communication. Replace that Harry Potter with a book that you love. Imagine one textbook in that bag…

Sport is a curriculum subject. I am a sportsman’s wife and he often tells me that he didn’t learn anything in school – he learnt it on the cricket ground. But I’m not talking about skill. I’m talking about teaching angles. Decimals, fractions, percentages in context to IPL – three months of the year let’s use it to our advantage. Let’s get things in perspective. History simply taught through drama, no dates to remember, no textbook. The higher educators talk about their challenges in the higher education space – ‘We want the children to think, communicate, manage time, make decisions, solve problems, all of that’ and, like many of my previous speakers this afternoon, we still don’t teach them. Imagine project management, a task to set up their own company… You’ll have everything, organizational behavior, communication skills, HR, recruitment and life skills.

Imagine a Gladiator or Lagaan can become a history lesson. Imagine gaming as a subject and I agree, I have a 12-year-old, they get there faster than I ever will! Why can’t gaming be that subject, why can’t it be fun for these kids and you can still teach? I’m a strong advocator of the game Minecraft. It isn’t putting dopamine in their brain. It actually teaches science in a way that you and I don’t.

This is a story that my son told me, when I took him through this presentation… ‘Mama, don’t bother them with these stories and don’t tell them my stories, but the fact is ‘Big Bang Theory’ taught me about quantum physics, that no other physics teacher has ever been able to. And I’ve realized they are not geeks’. Learning automatically by just watching! Imagine if gaming was that subject that was introduced, how much more would they learn!

So these were some radical propositions and you are going to say, ‘Okay great Fatema, let’s try and experiment and see what we can do with it. Who’s going to teach?’ That seems to be our fundamental question. Where are these teachers? Everyone seems to talk about lack of teachers, underpaid, passionate teachers but we don’t know where these teachers are. But before we can get there, who are these teachers? Who is that evolved teacher? I listed a few thoughts down, these are all personal passionate educators, a group of us as a part of KA Edu has put this together. The teacher needs to do more research and lo and behold! They aren’t PhDs, they don’t know how to research. They need to be updated about trends and practices and, with due respect to everyone, I think people need to know what charter schools in America, New Zealand and what little schools in the Anganwadi classification in our country are doing. We just need to know what is happening everywhere.

Subject matter expertise – don’t get me wrong, I do not mean that we are in la la land where teachers can just say ‘Let’s just go and explore’; eventually we are still taking those board exams. I do understand that the Prime Minister is inviting participation from private players within the industry cross section to propose what schools should look like and, as we understand, this might be rolled out in 2020. So people are working. Subject matter expertise is an element of importance because the children have to take exams. I’ll be worried if my 12-year-old goes to his English teacher and says, ‘But Miss that’s factually incorrect because if you actually know the organizational structure especially the hierarchy in England, the Queen is fictitious in terms of her role and position’ and the teacher got upset. He was sent to a corner to think about how to not disrupt the classroom. So these teachers must also be conflict managers and be smart enough to handle these questions, because you don’t want that disruption to change the world of a young class. You need them to be problem solvers.

Advertisement

This story appeared in the September 2017 issue of ScooNews magazine.

Continue Reading

SGEF2017

Tips for educators on accepting, employing and enjoying digital learning from Prof. Sugata Mitra

This generation doesn’t take to orders, not because they are indisciplined – we often think they are indisciplined but every generation says about the next, ‘Oh they are all going to the dogs!’ Nobody is indisciplined, we are just adjusting and living with our time. This generation needs a reason.

Published

on

Books as Technology

If you look at the way the education system has evolved, there is a rationale. The rationale is that for the first 16 to 17 years of your life, you learn a whole lot of things. You are taught by people who know it. Why do you have to be taught? Because you don’t have access to that information easily. This was the case, for example, in the 15th century, where if you wanted to learn something, you had to find an expert and ask him or her to please explain it to you. So that’s where the teaching bit comes. When books came, which was the first sort of impact of technology, suddenly the teacher’s knowledge could be tapped into a non-human form – the book. And there was equal controversy, I believe, at that time about the fact that books were going to ruin the education system! ‘What will teachers now do? Children will just pick up the book and they will figure it out!’ Then the teachers said, ‘No, that’s not going to happen because how do you know which book you have to read? The teacher will tell you!’ So, the curriculum, the library, the books, that kind of system came in…

The Big Shift

This happens for the first 17 years because after that, once you get into your job, you don’t have access to all those books. You can’t carry your library on your head – you have to have it inside your head! So if you are lost, you are stuck, you are on a ship going somewhere and you want to know where you are, you use your sextant, point to a star, you use your knowledge of trigonometry, you look at your watch and you figure it out. All this you learnt in the first 17 years. But what happens when you can carry the library with you? That’s the shift that we are going through. Not just the library, you can carry everything with you! So, if you’re now stuck on a ship, the new generation looks at a sextant and says, ‘What is this?’ Then you say ‘Well, trigonometry…’ and he says, ‘What is that?’ And you say, ‘But how will you find out where you are?’ And the new generation will say, ‘Here’s my phone’.

We have to make that shift. We still believe that there is something very deep and important about using a sextant and trigonometrical knowledge and so on to figure out things. And we find it very bad that you just look at your phone and it tells you where you are! Fifty years from now there will be teachers who will say, ‘What is trigonometry? I don’t know’. Teachers will not think that the internet is such a big thing. So the SGEF conference you are having today, where we are talking about the internet and technology all the time, if there was a 10-year-old here – and this has happened to me in England – he would ask, ‘This conference is about the internet? But why are you having a conference about the internet? It’s everywhere!’ He has never known a world where the internet never existed.

Advertisement

Just In Time’ Learning

The first thing we must remember is that packing your head for the first 17 years of your life, like a suitcase for a journey, is no longer required. The stuff is available everywhere – whenever you need it, you can have it. You don’t need a ‘just-in-case’ education. Why were you taught trigonometry? Just in case you were stuck on a ship going nowhere. First of all, you know you’re never going to be stuck on a ship going nowhere. And secondly, even if you were, you could figure it out. You can type into your phone ‘Teach me some Trigonometry’ and it will teach you in 10 minutes. So the shift is from ‘just in case’ to ‘just in time’.
So what do we have to do? Are we teachers not needed? It’s not true. We have to enable children to do ‘Just In Time’ learning. How to learn quickly, how to learn accurately, how to search for the right thing – this is our job! So the job is changing. If teachers could realise that, then they wouldn’t have this attitude of ‘Technology is evil, technology will take away my job!’ We have to understand, technology doesn’t remain technology. You don’t think my clothes are technology, do you? It was once upon a time huge technology! My watch, my shoes, they used to be technology – they are not technology any more.  To the generation that is growing up, the internet and smartphones are not technology; they are things that you live with.

Teaching Using Tech

One of the topmost things to do, is instead of saying ‘I will teach you’, you shift to, ‘Can you learn this?’ It becomes a question. Instead of saying ‘I’m going to teach you about volcanoes’, you could say, ‘You know, it’s important to know certain things about volcanoes, so I’ll give you 20 minutes, can you figure it out and tell me?’ So you are reversing the process – the student is telling you, and not the other way around. It’s not a hard change to make once you are sensitive to it.

This generation doesn’t take to orders, not because they are indisciplined – we often think they are indisciplined but every generation says about the next, ‘Oh they are all going to the dogs!’ Nobody is indisciplined, we are just adjusting and living with our time. So you must understand that with this generation you cannot tell them something like, ‘Don’t slouch, walk properly’. Now you will wonder why you shouldn’t tell someone this, it’s a nice thing to tell somebody. Well, it isn’t. This generation needs a reason. So they will come back with, ‘Why can’t I slouch? I want to slouch’. So then you reply, ‘You know, there are three muscles here which get weakened periodically if you slouch…’ something like that! They will understand that language. If you don’t know, you say something like, ‘I think it does something to your skeletal-muscular system. We are bipeds, we are meant to walk in a certain way. Just google it…’ If he googles it, he won’t slouch after that because he knows the reason. In a way, I welcome that quality in this generation because it’s the generation of reason, not orders.

I often hear teachers say, ‘My role has changed, from a teacher to that of a guide’. That’s not true anymore. You cannot guide people inside the internet; it’s too big to guide. Guide means you know where you are going – you often don’t anymore. So what is your role? The role of a teacher, I think, is of a friend. What you are saying to your class is, ‘You go there, I don’t know where you will land up, but I’ll be with you’. …From the back, instead of from the front. And children love it if they can go home and say, ‘My teacher is my friend’.

Advertisement

Reading vs. Internet

I am often told that reading a book helps you go deeper into the topic while the internet gives quick, superficial answers to questions. But I think it goes both ways. It’s true what you’re saying – if you read a book you can sometimes go deeper inside but I could take another example of where reading is not as good as speaking. The context would be poetry. To speak out a poem has a different, deeper connect than to read it. It’s the argument turned backwards where reading isn’t as good as it seems! On the internet what happens is that yes, you don’t get the depth of the book but you get the width that the book could never offer. Books don’t point to other books; the internet is all about pointing. So it’s a different medium. Should we not read books? I’m not sure. I’m from a different generation where I am horrified by the idea that we won’t read books! I think we should read books but then maybe I’m old-fashioned, maybe the day of the book is over…

The Lazy Issue

Does the internet make children lazy? Again, just for the sake of being argumentative, I could apply that to history. Don’t you think that a farmer from 1500 BC would have looked at you and said, ‘They are terribly lazy! Look at the way they look, they have no muscles, they can’t stand up properly, they can’t work in the field etc’. We were very active but that’s because of anthropological reasons – we got down from the trees, we got up on our feet, we had to run for our food, we had to protect our families, shield ourselves from the weather, the works! We were a lot hardier… but we used to die at 30. Now, we are soft, we are lazy by those standards, we are like a sack of potatoes sitting there, every one of us eats too much, we probably sleep too much, we don’t bother about anything… we live to be 75! So, to me, it’s an achievement. It’s the achievement of homo sapiens. So, yes we are lazier – thank god!

Lines that find resonance…

Oh poetry on order! Why not? You know, teachers sometimes ask, ‘What should I look for in my job, in my career?’ Here’s what you should look for…

Advertisement

‘…to see the bright eyes of the dear one discover

She thought that I was not unworthy to love her. 

There chiefly I sought thee, there only I found thee;        

Her glance was the best of the rays that surround thee;   

When it sparkled o'er aught that was bright in my story,

I knew it was love, and I felt it was glory.’

Advertisement

Byron

This interview appeared in the September 2017 issue of ScooNews magazine.

Continue Reading

SGEF2017

Listen to your child to train him to listen, says Valentina Trivedi, writer, story teller and educator

“We pay a lot of attention to communication skills, and yet it still means just public speaking or speaking confidently or speaking well, but that’s just one half of it. The other half of communication is listening. How are we teaching listening?”, asks Valentina Trivedi.

Published

on

I call myself a ‘Childist’; like we have feminists I am a ‘Childist’ because I look at things from a child’s perspective. The child inside me is still very alive and kicking and I can’t not look at the world from a child’s perspective! I do teacher training programs, story-telling performances, stand-alone sessions and ticketed sessions at literature festivals and events.

One of your core strengths is story telling. You believe deeply in its power…
Well, I started connecting with stories before I could sit up. I grew up in a pre-television, pre-computer age and I’m an only child, so story books were my soul mates. I had very understanding adults around me; my parents, and I had some great teachers and they always gave me that space which is what is lacking in children’s lives today. They are not getting the space to let their mind wander and that’s where learning actually happens.

There is just far too much teaching and not enough learning. And also in this too much teaching, curriculum, jargon, short term outcomes we forget that education is actually a long term process. It’s not like boiling an egg. This is something that is going to last a lifetime, you are building it for a lifetime. So we can’t be measuring everything with short term goals. That is the kind of learning that comes through stories and with children given that space and through positive inputs.

I never say anything negative to children as they are very special people. It’s the adults around them that make things go wrong. Children are amazing; they come up with the most original ideas and have completely new perspectives to do things. I love creating stories or songs with them.

I would like to share a little song. There are these two little girls who come over to my place who are of different age groups. We were playing and doing mimes. I have a lot of hand puppets. We decided that one of us would create a story and two of us would create a song around it.

Advertisement

So the story was about a koel (cuckoo) and a kauva (crow) and the song went like this…

Ek tha kauva, ek thi koel….

Ek tha kauva, ek thi koel….

Kauva Mr. Basu aur koel Mrs. Goyal

Kauva Mr. Basu aur koel Mrs. Goyal

So this is the kind of wackiness that a child has. A lot of the times the adults just push it aside and say ‘It’s not there in the course or curriculum. Where is this going to get you?’ This is what is going to get you to the other places. Not to be a frontrunner in a herd, but to leap above that. The creativity leap! Children are not able to find an outlet for their creativity or curiosity. And that is what I feel very passionately about. I live in a colony which has children of all ages and I interact with them.

Advertisement

As children grow older, does it get more difficult to ignite their imagination, this spark in them?
I would definitely suggest that parents do it at a much younger age. For any other job you require a qualification, prior knowledge or some work experience. But parenting is the only thing that we are allowed to get into without doing a thing about it and I really think it’s unfair! I often tell adults if children knew what they were entitled to and what they are missing out on, all us adults would be behind bars!

When you say igniting the spark it’s a big thing. They are just big terms. You have to go back to the basics. You have to go back to simple things that are always going to hold true. The world is changing very quickly. There is technology; the amount of change that has happened due to technology in the last 30 years is massive and it’s going to keep changing. But there are some things that are going to be constant. So I say, connect with your child and when I say that it doesn’t mean your child is sitting with you and you are sitting with your cell phone. So if you have a problem with your child’s screen time, look at how much screen time you are giving yourself.

When my son was younger and we used to go on holidays, wherever there was a television in the room we never switched it on. It was not an enforced rule but it’s just something he grew up with. Each of us carried our books and board games. Parents have to be very conscious about the world they need to be nurtured in. I would like to say ‘Bachpan’ has two syllables. ‘Bach’ and ‘pan’ – bachana kya hai aur panapane kya dena hai. A lot of things are naturally inherent to children, which are divine, and we kind of strangle it out of them. So that’s why it has to start early.

In today’s age where we are online 24/7, how can story-telling still be relevant?
Ah! It is surprising to me also that it is so relevant. And with passing time I become more and more aware of its relevance. At the surface of it, it feels like a form of entertainment. You tell a story and a child is happy or an adult is happy and that’s it, but the kind of cognitive development that happens when a child is listening to a story is amazing. That can’t be taught. It’s like osmosis the way the learning happens. So you have to allow that to happen. It will not happen if the child is staring at a screen. Of course there are challenging games (digital) but it’s when they are forming their own pictures in their mind, when there is no picture to support the audio, that their imagination is growing.

During teacher training programs I ask the teachers, ‘So what is the big deal about imagination? You can get your marks in maths and science, so why imagination?’ A lot of them are not able to answer this question. The minute you say storytelling you have somebody saying ‘But imagination is required’ and then somebody will realise that without imagination we won’t be where we are. Like man imagined he could fly and so we have aeroplanes today. The other thing is because of our cell phones and other devices the attention span is greatly reduced. You are flipping channels. The minute you don’t like something you flip and flip and flip the channels. So listening to stories enhances your attention span. You learn to pay attention.

We pay a lot of attention to communication skills, and yet it still means just public speaking or speaking confidently or speaking well, but that’s just one half of it. The other half of communication is listening. How are we teaching listening? We are not even paying attention, other that telling a child ‘Listen to me’. I tell parents who say this to their child that if you haven’t taught your child to cycle is it fair to ask him to get onto it and start pedalling? And they said no. So I ask them, ‘Have you taught him to listen?’ ‘Yes of course we keep telling him to listen every day!’ But telling is different, have you ensured that he has learnt to listen. How do you ensure listening? You model it. You show him by listening to him. So listen to your children. You will have a better relation with your child if you will listen more to them than telling them to listen.

Advertisement

This interview appeared in the September 2017 issue of ScooNews magazine.

Continue Reading

SGEF2017

Tech is finally being accepted in schools and education says Meenakshi Uberoi, Founding Director, De Pedagogics

Meenakshi Uberoi, Founding Director De Pedagogics, talks to Anjana Deepak about tech finally being accepted in an exclusive interview at SGEF 2017

Published

on

Meenakshi Uberoi, Founding Director De Pedagogics, talks about tech finally being accepted in an exclusive interview at SGEF 2017

What are the top global trends you think could be incorporated in the Indian education system?
1. What would really work well is bringing in technology, not as a tool but understanding the technology and how it can enhance classrooms and the way it can help the facilitator. Using these tools we can make learning more meaningful and can make the student’s voice heard.

2. Apart from that, what’s trending is student-centred learning. We should give the students opportunities to ask questions. The art of asking questions will play a big role in the days to come.

3. We also need to look at the special needs of the children, as every child has different needs or has his/her way of learning. Though various schools say that they have implemented different styles of learning there is still a gap and these institutes can lend a lot more to learning in classrooms.

4. Teacher training is another area I would say is overrated. Every school holds training sessions, but are those one day sessions really meaningful? Is there anyone they can go back to, to ask questions? Can a teacher find out where something was implemented and was successful or realise where she had to pause and go back. Long term relationships with learning communities need to be built. There are not many educator communities that are existent globally. There is Microsoft Educator Community, where global educators come in and interact, reach out to learn from each other, bring exchange programs and open out their classrooms to the world. There is Learning Forward India which is led by Sandeep Dutt where you can join by paying a nominal fee of Rs.500 a year and is a very effective program due to the way the professional training platform is built. It is something that you and I must look at in the days to come.

Advertisement

Can we ever hope to break away from the rote system of learning and examination?
I would put it differently; I would not want to do away with the system of rote learning because it is going to be ages before this system goes away. I would say let’s find some effective ways of rote learning. This system of learning that we have in India has produced the Satya Nadellas (Microsoft) and Sundar Pichais (Google) of the world, so why do away with a system that is doing so well? The world might come back asking you for better methods of making rote learning more interesting. So let’s find ways to make rote learning more approachable, adaptable and engaging.

How do you think we can improve communication amongst children?
I think the quietest child gets a voice once technology comes in, because with technology you are interacting with yourself and a device. There is no one to give you feedback which might be challenging or which might be right/ wrong. So it becomes more like journal writing and you doing it with your mind means you are literally spilling your thoughts onto your screen, be it through your writing or speaking. Through this you are sharing yourself in a very non- threatening way. I believe that technology has removed the threat from learning.

This interview appeared in the September 2017 issue of ScooNews magazine.

Continue Reading

SGEF2017

Joyanto Mukherjee, Founder CEO, Tutored And Trained, speaks on bridging the student-teacher chasm in the virtual world

We are cool teachers. We have our certificates proving we are good educators. But even in today’s time, we are losing kids to a world which somewhere is not explanatory to us. Let’s not run away… because it’s about to get worse.

Published

on

Joyanto Mukherjee, Founder CEO, Tutored And Trained, and youngest dean at 25, on bridging the student-teacher chasm in the virtual world

Rude awakening
The distance between teachers and students is increasing in a very different way, not in the classroom but in the virtual space. How many of us have heard of this unfortunate phenomenon known as Saraha? Some of us have downloaded it, it’s a good ego boost for us, for kids to tell us, ‘Oh Ma’am you are so good… You teach so well in class…’ We tell our friends how amazing it is. But there’s another side to it. And that’s the side that I want to talk about, because I thought that being a young educator would make me a cool educator. I have trophies from my students in my classes, in my colleges, calling me the Coolest Dean, the Best Friend Ever. And on March 27 this year, you would have heard a very tragic story of a kid committing suicide on Facebook Live. He was my student.

We always feel that we are connected to our students, we always feel that there are some things we are doing well for our students. But as professors, as teachers, how many times do we actually look at their virtual life; the real life which they are leading? They have a different world of their own. I remember this particular student of mine had called me up on March 17, to wish me for my birthday. We spoke. I asked him how he was doing; he had been off the radar for four months. He said, ‘Sir, I’m just sorting things out, don’t worry. And things will be perfect in some time’. March 27, we know what happened.

Social media – their life
As teachers, as professionals, we are on social media but how many times are we reading students’ timelines? Do we see their status messages on G-Talk, on Twitter? Are we making a concerted effort to understand that part of it? And unfortunately Saraha happened in between. Students are getting pressurised today to be on Saraha, because they want that single compliment from an anonymous space. And on top of that the student says, ‘Thank you for the compliment. Can I know who this is?’ This is where the students are today. They are trying to connect in the virtual world, still wanting that love, and we are overlooking this. Can you jot down the last five things that your students put up on Facebook? Do you remember any of their status messages, their check-ins? It’s difficult, right? This is the only connect that we have with our students today. We look for counselling in school, have we ever sat with them to understand why they were socially inactive for the past 21 days? A kid who generally tweets 20 times a day, who constantly posts Facebook updates – by the way, 18-21 year-olds hate Facebook now because their parents are on it. So they have now shifted to Snapchat and Instagram – how many of us are looking at that? As knowledge-givers, we think that social media is distraction. For children, this is their life.

I know students who crib, ‘I put up a profile picture last week, why didn’t you like it?’ And there are fights over that! ‘Where were you last night? You told me you were at home but I saw you check in at a club with others’. As educators, I definitely feel that when this incident happened with me, I had let someone down. I thought I was it, because I tweet at least 50 times a day, I’m on all the social media spaces – except Saraha. If that day I had just switched on his live feed… I could have rushed there; my office is just 20 minutes away from his place. From that time on I’ve taken to platforms to speak to principals, to educators about the need for us to accept students’ social media life. Why are we dismissive of it?

Advertisement

Giving back
It is not the same as when we were in school or college. I was in college between 2003-2006; we were the original ‘Orkutyas’ if you remember Orkut at that time. At that time I could understand my teacher saying, ‘What is this?’ I could understand the deliberate attempt by them not to come on social media. Today it has become so important for us to be a part of our students’ social media life because that is where the connect is needed. Students tag us in photos, in statuses, on Teacher’s Day, thanking us and so on. We are so proud of it. Let’s give it back. Because this is the only breadcrumb trail we have to see where our student is going. Social media is what they use to communicate so many things, so many times.

Have you seen your students’ Snapchat trails? That’s investigative journalism. You see, via their trails, that they live a life. I happened to ask a student, why Snapchat? He said, ’24 hours mein sab kuch chala gaya. And my parent doesn’t know how to run Snapchat.’ This is escapism for them. And this is a dangerous time. Like Zuckerberg said, it would be hours being spent and not minutes. These are not times when students switch their phones off. Thanks to Mr. Ambani, everything is free today, and you are virtually walking in 4G.

It is scary for educators but the fact is we can’t shake this off; it’s high time we shook hands with it. Because when we talk about counselling, what are we talking about? Students don’t want to walk up to a counsellor. But, believe me, at 2 am, because they know that you are accessible on Whatsapp, someone pings me, ‘Sir are you awake?’ And I happen to say yes. Two and a half hours we ended up chatting. Will a counsellor be available at 2 in the morning, for someone to just open up?

Be an active player
The student-teacher relationship is going a very different way and the more we run away from it, the more the distance we are creating. It’s no longer a 10 am-6 pm for a student and a teacher today. They want access to you at 9 o’clock at night, just to clear a doubt – ‘Ma’am, tomorrow there is a test. Can we solve this, I have this doubt…’ When we were young, we were scared of our teachers because at that time tech wasn’t there to support us. I couldn’t pick up the landline and call my Maths teacher at 10 at night. We wouldn’t dare do that. But today things have changed. Why are we not adapting? Why can’t we have 24×7 counselling lines in schools only online? We have these active school and college Whatsapp groups; unfortunately they happen to be active only for two things – ‘Kal lecture hai?’ and ‘Main nahin aa raha hoon’. Or then the teacher says she isn’t taking the lecture. Can we utilise these groups better? Everyday there is someone in our circle, on our timeline, trying to express to you or to the world that things are not fine in his life. We can’t expect the 19-year-old friend to pick up that clue. The onus is on us, because the parents are generally out of the picture, wondering why their kids are always online. They call it the thumb game – I call it the thumb life.

I really encourage all educators to take social media more seriously. We need to understand it. And to understand it, we need to be an active player on it. We can’t have someone else running our own Whatsapp or Facebook accounts. Because all that student of yours wants is that when he tags you, you say thanks and, believe me, the best gift you can give in return is when you tag him or her and say, ‘Proud to be with you…Proud to have you as a kid’.

We are cool teachers. We have our certificates proving we are good educators. But even in today’s time, we are losing kids to a world which somewhere is not explanatory to us. Let’s not run away… because it’s about to get worse.

Advertisement

This story appeared in the September 2017 issue of ScooNews magazine.

Continue Reading

SGEF2017

Educationist, mathematician and pioneer of the Super 30 programme, Anand Kumar is looking at going online. An SGEF 2017 exclusive.

Anand Kumar does not accept donations for the Super 30 programme. His team creates funds by organizing evening classes in Patna.

Published

on

Photo caption – Team ScooNews with Anand Kumar

After so much recognition and success, do you feel the need to share the secrets of Super 30 with privileged students as well?

Of course! Many come to us. Earlier people who had no money came and would say ‘How will I study?’ Now things have changed, now some come and say ‘If I am rich or poor it is not our fault!’ So we want to go online and with the help Scoonews and Ravi Santlani, see how we can work on this together.

There is now a film being made on you. How has your Bollywood experience has been so far?

It has been very good. Many people are involved and they are making a big film, a real story to be made, not fiction and masala.

Advertisement

What was it like shooting ‘Kaun Banega Crorepati’ with Amitabh Bachchan?

This was my second experience; first was during the shooting of the film AARAKSHAN. I had had the chance to interact with him and also went for the film promotion with him. When I met him recently, he shared old experiences.

Up until now you have been coaching students. Do you think it is more important to train teachers?

Our old students want to become teachers so we are helping them. When I am travelling they take over because they are aware of our techniques. With ScooNews we would like to spread more teacher training programmes.

How do you actually select candidates for the Super 30 programme?

Students who are 10th grade graduates, we also see how passionate they are, if they are truly under-privileged and how curious they are for growth. We have a written exam based on the 10th syllabus.

Advertisement

The funding that you get must have helped you…

We have never ever taken a penny as donation. In spite of the expansion of Super 30, we have never taken any money. Also we have proved that even without resources if you have the will, one can do it.

This interview appeared in the September 2017 issue of ScooNews magazine.

Continue Reading

SGEF2017

An interview with Dan Lejerskar, co-founder EON Reality, on making knowledge transfer accessible, affordable and available to all, in an exclusive at SGEF 2017

EON Reality is an 18-year-old multinational virtual reality and augmented reality software developer company headquartered in California. Dan Lejerskar is also an expert in simulation-based learning.

Published

on

EON Reality is an 18-year-old multinational virtual reality and augmented reality software developer company headquartered in California. Dan Lejerskar is also an expert in simulation-based learning.
He explains that technology kills millions of jobs but paradoxically technology is also one source that creates new jobs. There is an increasing gap of unfilled jobs. He opines that in education, India is in a race, a knowledge transfer race, but the funds available for each student are decreasing. So one has to teach more with less time and less money!

What is the aim of EON Reality in making a change in the education sector?
The key is to improve knowledge transfer. If you think about what we are doing in education, there is very little need to memorise things because Google does it best! So what we are trying to do now is to expand the communitive dimension, think up things like creativity, collaboration and creation. Virtual reality and augmented reality lends itself very well for this type of knowledge acquisition.

How has your experience been in convincing people in Asia to take up something like VR and AR?
We have almost 17 years of experience in Asia. We established ourselves very early in Singapore, even though Singapore is quite advanced. I do agree that some of the videos in my presentation look futuristic but that’s when we land. When we borrow someone’s phone and show them that they can experience both virtual reality and augmented reality, then all the doubt disappears. Seeing is believing and I would say Asia is one of the best locations because people are so tech-savvy.

How has your experience been in India?
The experience in India is still very early but there is a lot of interest and a lot of demand for fast knowledge, especially in the vocational training area. There is a big gap there at the moment. We have made our first investment and we will announce it shortly. It is going to be in Chennai. Our goal is to set up 10 centres to cover 10 regions in India as well as covering various segments, not only education but also sectors like energy, manufacturing, aerospace and so on.

Each country is different and their needs are different. How does your research team adapt to that?
Simply what we do is we find the best local partners and we team up with them. We make the major part of the investment but we also ask them to co-invest. So we know that they are interested. They help us and advise us and make sure that the ‘Indian’ solution is ‘Indian’ and not anything else.

Advertisement

It appears that this would benefit the higher education sector more than the school education sector…
I would divide the market into three areas – K-12, vocational and professional training, and higher education. Today, the number one is vocational training, number two is higher education and number three is K-12 but I would say that in the next 3-5 years, K-12 will catch up with higher education. 

This story appears in the September 2017 issue of ScooNews magazine.

Continue Reading

SGEF2017

Honouring Heroes who Strive to Educate India’s Disadvantaged Children

The Scoonews Teacher Warrior Awards will identify such exemplary educators every year and felicitate them, enabling them to rack up popularity for their cause and network with like-minded individuals.

Published

on

The first edition of the Scoonews Global Educators Fest 2017 held over August 18 and 19 at the Hyatt Regency, Gurugram brought together some of the brightest minds from across the globe in the field of education. India’s most exciting education brainstorm, it witnessed no less than 60 speakers, 350 delegates and 40 partners exchanging ideas, concepts and more.

On a more touching note, the occasion also marked the presentation of the Scoonews Teacher Warrior Awards 2017. The awards honoured 16 of the country’s best and bravest teachers, striving to give disadvantaged children a fighting chance at a better present and a future bright with possibilities. These outstanding individuals, who were featured in the June issue of Scoonews, have taken learning out of the classrooms of privilege, to those that need it most yet all too rarely receive it.

The auditorium resounded with applause as these heroes ventured up on stage to acknowledge this recognition of their commendable and inspiring service. Awarded by Prince Lakshyaraj Singh Mewar Trustee, Maharana of Mewar Charitable Foundation; Joyanto Mukherjee, Founder, Tutored and Trained (TNT); and Scoonews Founder-CEO Ravi Santlani, these Teacher Warriors were clearly the brightest stars in an already glittering firmament that evening.

The Scoonews Teacher Warrior Awards will identify such exemplary educators every year and felicitate them, enabling them to rack up popularity for their cause and network with like-minded individuals.

Winners – Scoonews Teacher Warrior Awards 2017

Advertisement

Akshai Abraham, Founder, Project Khel – Imparting life skills education through play

Babar Ali, Founder, Anand Siksha Niketan – The youngest headmaster at age 16

Dr Amitabh Mehrotra, Chairperson, SPARC – Overcoming cerebral palsy to start a school for disabled children

Faith Gonsalves – Pioneering a community-led approach to music education for social uplift of ‘at-risk’ children

Fr Maria Julian – Imparting computer education to under-privileged kids in a self-sustainable bus

G K Swamy, Founder & CEO, Purkal Youth Development Society – Transforming lives of rural children through holistic education, nutrition and healthcare

Advertisement

Gazi Jalaluddin, Founder, Sundarban Orphanage and Welfare Trust – A taxi driver working to give poor children an opportunity to attend school

Mittal Patel, Managing Trustee, VSSM – Working to ensure children of Nomadic and De-notified tribes get their right to education

Mrinalika Rathore, Founder, Sashaktikaran – Changing societal mind-sets and empowering children

Navin Gulia, Founder, Apni Duniya Apna Ashiana (ADAA) – A glimmer of goodness in young lives darkened by the grime of reality

Sandeep Desai, Founder, Shloka Missionaries – Collected donations in Mumbai’s local trains to start four schools in rural India

Sudheer Jalagam, Founder, Tea with Headmaster – Bringing parents and teachers together to discuss issues prevailing in government schools

Advertisement

Sugata Mitra – Fuelling the training and development of nearly a million young Indians through Hole in the Wall and other projects

Sujata Sahu, Founder, 17000 Ft Foundation – Transforming lives of thousands of children in remote Ladakh

The Kung Fu Nuns – Helping hands, healing hearts in the Himalayas

Uttam Teron, Founder, Parijat Academy – Started a school of ‘Joyful Learning’ for tribal children in Assam

You can view and download the teacher warrior awards photos from https://1drv.ms/f/s!Au6LxMjCRD8IhJhQoM-J-VenG7iOJQ

Advertisement
Continue Reading

SGEF2017

ScooNews Global Educators Fest 2017 – The Unconference!

Over two days brimming with ideas and excitement, the ScooNews Global Educators Fest 2017 whipped up a storm of the best kind – the brain kind! The #unconference to encourage exchange of ideas between the finest education minds, was attended by no less than 60 speakers, 350 delegates and 40 partners

Published

on

Over two days brimming with ideas and excitement, the ScooNews Global Educators Fest 2017 whipped up a storm of the best kind – the brain kind! The #unconference to encourage exchange of ideas between the finest education minds, was attended by no less than 60 speakers, 350 delegates and 40 partners from the field of education, both national and international.

The keynote address on Day One was delivered by Shri Anil Swarup, Secretary, School Education and Literacy, MHRD, who also unveiled the first anniversary issue of ScooNews magazine, along with Professor Sugata Mitra and Ravi Santlani, Founder-CEO, ScooNews.

While enumerating the work undertaken to identify and replicate successful educational practices across the country, Shri Swarup also hailed ScooNews Global Educators Fest for provoking discussion and generating workable points for improved quality of education.

The Hyatt Regency, Gurgaon transformed into a playground of ideas over August 18 and 19 as participants attended discussions and workshops, engaging at length with both experts and fellow educators. The purveyors of this feast of ideas were stalwarts like Professor Sugata Mitra, TED winner and Professor Newcastle University UK, Sonam Wangchuk, founder SECMOL and HIAL, Ladakh, Matthew Raggett, Headmaster, The Doon School. Inspiration came knocking through the speeches of Prince Lakshyaraj Singh Mewar, Trustee, Maharana of Mewar Charitable Foundation and the incredible Jigme Karuna Yangchen, of the Kung Fu Nuns of the Himalayas.

An incisive look at the role of VR and AR in Education was shared by Dan Lejerskar, Chairman Eon Reality Inc. Joyanto Mukherjee, Founder and CEO Tutored and Trained – shared insights on ‘Enhancing Student Teacher Relationship to Improve Education’. The audience were treated to the next level of Curriculum administration by Rashenah Walker from the UAE who spoke on ‘Using Gamification to Increase Language Acquisition’. Aditya Tripathi, CEO, Marksharks andVaibhav Chhabra, Founder Makers Asylum both emphasised the importance of introducing ‘learning by doing’ through their talks and live examples.

Advertisement

While Day 1 culminated in the ScooNews Teacher Warriors awards, applauding those striving for the education of India’s disadvantaged children, Day 2 celebrated the ScooNews Global Education Awards, which recognises outstanding contributions in transforming education through pioneering practices and use of technology.

And after the brainstorm that was ScooNews Global Educators Fest 2017, there is a purposeful calm, where the many wonderful and innovative thoughts shared will hopefully be put to practice!

To view and download the photos of the sessions and proceedings at ScooNews Global Educators Fest 2017, please visit https://1drv.ms/f/s!Au6LxMjCRD8IhJZe2RhtNMaf0-nSUw

Continue Reading

Newsletter

Advertisement
Education1 week ago

Education for Girls

Education1 week ago

Salient Features of NEP-2020

Innovation1 week ago

School Innovation Council

Education2 weeks ago

Ministry of Education organises National Workshop on Achieving Learning Outcome

Education Technology3 weeks ago

All Students are Good Students

National4 weeks ago

Sunbeam students are the champions of USQ 2022

Opinion1 month ago

Insight into constructive learning methods by an experienced educator

International2 months ago

Archana Surana to represent India at the CUMULUS Global Association

Innovation2 months ago

Korroboree uses D2L Brightspace to make learning authentic, measurable and seamless

Opinion2 months ago

Future of Education & Skilling in India

Education2 months ago

Andhra Pradesh takes another step towards Quality Education

Innovation2 months ago

Are you engaging Students with digital credentials?

Education2 months ago

Recognising Students in GD Goenka World School

Education3 months ago

Ministry of Education releases National Achievement Survey (NAS) 2021 report

Education3 months ago

India’s first, exclusive k -10 child safety school program – Hapchi is building an informed and resilient generation

Education3 months ago

Leveraging The Power of Analytics in Education

Innovation3 months ago

Digital Education is changing the way we learn

Information3 months ago

Guidelines regarding precautions to be observed by schools to combat the ill-effects of the heat-wave

Principals on Board3 months ago

What is Hybrid/Blended Learning?

Principals on Board3 months ago

Teaching Online: How Some Online Classes Can Be More Effective Than Offline Classes

Principals on Board3 months ago

Emerging Educational Trends: Experiential Learning

Principals on Board3 months ago

Powered By Innovation, Education Prevails!

Principals on Board3 months ago

Is innovation in pedagogy a function of “the purpose of education”?

Education3 months ago

STTAR FUTURE LEARNING SYSTEMS: Learn To Lead The Future of Education From Global Experts

Principals on Board3 months ago

Twenty-First Century Pedagogy & Innovative Teaching Methods

Good news2 years ago

20+ Images Showing The Enthusiasm of Teachers & Students on School Reopening

Learning2 years ago

10 Inspiring Educational Quotes by Mahatma Gandhi

Opinion2 years ago

The Curious Case Of School Dropouts & School-Switching In 2020 In India

News4 months ago

Daly College, Indore announces new leadership

Principals on Board3 months ago

The most valuable resource that all teachers in the 21st-century need is collaboration

Knowledge2 years ago

UNESCO Reveals Countries Producing The Highest No. Of STEM Graduates

Opinion1 month ago

Insight into constructive learning methods by an experienced educator

Learning2 years ago

Remembering The Great Teacher & Nationalist Sri Aurobindo on His Birth Anniversary & India’s Independence Day

Initiative8 months ago

NITI Aayog and Bharti Foundation announce the launch of ‘Convoke 2021-22’

Initiative2 years ago

Karnataka School’s Water Conservation Project Gets Praised Globally 

Opinion2 years ago

Dr Madhav Deo Saraswat on NEP: Vocational Training Makes Schools Progressive

Education Technology2 years ago

10 Myths & Truths About Online Learning You Need to Read Now!

Book Review1 year ago

Dads, The PA In Parenting: A Book That Shatters All Stereotypes About Roles Of Fathers

Schools1 year ago

Dr. Dheeraj Mehrotra Appointed As The Next Principal Of The NPS International School, Guwahati

Education1 week ago

Education for Girls

Education1 week ago

Salient Features of NEP-2020

Schools1 year ago

This World Bicycle Day, Here Are Two Stories About Schools Promoting Bike Riding

News12 months ago

Prof Sugata Mitra to join Board of Trustees of Montessori Group

Innovation2 months ago

Are you engaging Students with digital credentials?

Principals on Board3 months ago

21st Century Pedagogy and Teaching Methods

Knowledge2 years ago

National Mathematics Day (Dec 22): Birthday of the Great Mathematician Ramanujan 

Inspiration2 years ago

Mangaluru Teacher’s Dance Video Goes Viral While Teaching Alphabets & Phonics to 1st Graders

Education2 weeks ago

Ministry of Education organises National Workshop on Achieving Learning Outcome

Inspiration1 year ago

This Young Woman From A Tribal Village Is Teaching The Children While Schools Are Closed

Good news2 years ago

‘Soul’ Movie Protagonist is a Real Life Music Teacher From Queens

Policy2 months ago

Anurag Tripathi, Secretary, Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) discusses NEP2020

Knowledge2 years ago

Click here to watch our latest webinar live!

Event Round-up3 years ago

ScooNews | Early Ed Asia 2019 | Aftermovie

Events4 years ago

#PodarECEconf : Pursuing quality ECE

News4 years ago

#CBSE Class XII #Results #Highlights

Education5 years ago

The interesting story of India’s educational system | Adhitya Iyer

Young Talent5 years ago

A young scientist’s quest for clean water

International5 years ago

The Danger of Silence: Clint Smith

Initiative5 years ago

National Digital Library of India is an initiative by HRD Ministry

Inspiration5 years ago

Remembering Kalpana Chawla on her birthday!

Inspiration5 years ago

Message from Sadhguru for Students!

Inspiration5 years ago

Message from Sadhguru for Students!

Inspiration5 years ago

The Untapped Genius That Could Change Science for the Better

Education6 years ago

Eddy Zhong: How school makes kids less intelligent [email protected]

Education6 years ago

#TEDxCanberra : What if every child had access to music education…

Education6 years ago

Confessions of a Megaphone – Shrutidhar Paliwal – TED Talk

Bringing Change6 years ago

TED Talk: Bill Gates on Education and Good Teachers

Education6 years ago

Bring on the Learning Revolution! | Ken Robinson

Events6 years ago

Art With A Heart by Jayshree Periwal International School Students

Inspiration6 years ago

Afghan teen rapper sings to end child marriage

Inspiration6 years ago

This village school values its girl children.

Innovation6 years ago

ScooNews Exclusive: On a mission with The SunPedal Ride!

News6 years ago

Indian Students join global hunt for asteroids

Entertainment6 years ago

ScooNews goes “Back to School with Ashmit Patel”

National6 years ago

Students under Stress – We must help them

Trending