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UNESCO Launches ‘Girls Back to School’ to Overcome Gender Disparity During COVID

This Guide is a part of a global campaign to be launched in September beginning to ensure all girls can continue to learn during and after the COVID-19 pandemic

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Malala Fund, Plan International, UNESCO, UNGEI and UNICEF have launched Building Back Equal: Girls Back to School Guide.

The guide aims to help policymakers and practitioners in Ministries of Education and their partners address the gender dimensions of COVID-related school closures.

It provides targeted recommendations to ensure continuity of learning while schools are closed, and to establish comprehensive, timely and evidence-based plans for reopening schools in a way that is safe, gender-responsive and child-friendly, and meets the needs of the most marginalised girls.

It emphasises an approach to ‘build back equal’ through gender-responsive measures that transform education systems, prioritise resilience, and address the key bottlenecks and barriers to girls’ education.

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This guide was developed by partners in UNESCO’s COVID-19 Global Education Coalition’s Gender Flagship, as a part of a global campaign to be launched in September beginning to ensure all girls can continue to learn during and after the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Gender Flagship provides a collaborative platform for stakeholders committed to gender equality, and girls’ and women’s empowerment in and through education.

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INTRODUCTION

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused the largest disruption of education in history. Most governments around the world have temporarily closed schools and other learning spaces in recent months in an attempt to contain the spread of the virus. At the peak of the pandemic in April 2020, these nationwide closures impacted more than 1.5 billion students, or over 90% of the world’s student population, from pre-primary to higher education in 200 countries.1This unprecedented disruption to education has the potential to roll back substantial gains made on girls’ education in recent decades, with broader immediate and longer-term effects on the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals, including those related to poverty reduction, health and well-being, inclusive quality education and gender equality. The most marginalised, including girls with disabilities, those in conflict-affected contexts, remote and rural communities and those in the poorest quintile, are expected to be most affected by COVID-related school closures, facing additional constraints on their ability to fulfil their right to education, health and protection, among other rights. As some schools and educational institutions around the world have reopened and others are preparing to do so, governments, education sector officials, community leaders, teachers and school staff should see this as an opportunity to build back equal, through gender-responsive measures that transform education systems, prioritise resilience and address the key bottlenecks and barriers to girls’ education.

Check out the guide here:

Building Back Equal: Girls Back to School Guide

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What It Takes to Be Well-Educated; Not Just Well-Read

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The need to bridge the gap between what should be and what’s being delivered in the school educational system in India is most severe than ever before. As we see the rise in the number of Indians as global leaders in the corporate, tech, art and political sector we must ask ourselves whether we are catering to the demand of 21st century and doing justice to our younger generation or not!

It won’t be an exaggeration to say that India is living in one of its best times in terms of industrial growth, demand of higher education and service sector, religious and spiritual awakening and humongous rise in the national infrastructure and the commitment to grow further can definitely be seen when 3.3 percent of total GDP has been outlaid for infrastructure in Union Budget 2023-24 but at the same time this peak also alarms the need to prepare thought leaders, logical/critical individuals, go getters and prepare the most efficient workforce for the years to come.

What we need to deliver to the younger generation along with the industrial and employable skill is the idea and importance of mental health, argumentative skills, decision making skill, communication skill and to summarize the contemporary demand in a single word is to be the ‘human’ first in a way that the almighty intended us to be i.e. just, fair, hardworking with balanced scientific temperament. Even World Health Organization expressed serious concern over mental health issue of adolescents by stating that globally, one in seven 10-19-year-olds experiences a mental disorder, accounting for 13% of the global burden of disease in this age group.

NEP 2020 points out several changes in the formal education policy right from the pre-school till the university space but the right steps for its most efficient implementation so as to achieve a holistic and comprehensive development is still a long way to go. As per the All India Survey on Higher Education 2019 report, India’s higher education sector consists of 3.74 crore students in nearly 1,000 universities, 39,931 colleges, and 10,725 stand-alone institutions. Thus, a countrywide implementation of this mega education policy is going to be a mammoth exercise involving multiple stakeholders at the state, district, sub-district, and block levels.

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Change and regularly updating the curriculum, minimum standard maintenance of quality education, teachers training and uniformity amongst several state and national board are few urgent and at most necessary steps amongst other factors. And the functionaries of these changes aren’t just educational leaders and teachers but the parents and students themselves. They need to ask the right questions, consider all the factors such as time, investment and opportunities and be firm while saying a big NO to sub standard institutions which are just making a hole in their pockets in return of nothing more than a window dressing in the name of mark sheet and degree based system.

We have already achieved remarkable feet in terms of numeracy and literacy skills for foundation classes/toddlers, the Annual Status of Education Report says that in 2023, 73.6% of 14-18 year-olds could read a Class 2 level text, and arithmetically, in 2023, 43.3% of youth could do a simple (class 3-4 level) division problem; our graduates are breaking glass ceiling with every passing hour when it comes to innovation, design and product enhancement, Department for Promotion of Industry and Internal Trade (DPIIT) recognized 1,17,254 startups as on 31st December 2023 and as per the Economic Survey Report 2022-23 in 2022 alone, homegrown startups generated 2.69 Lacs jobs in the country. 

With the rising trend of Ed-tech and content creation through media there is plethora of knowledge awaiting to be learned but international exposure, state of the art facilities and hefty charges alone cannot cater to the students’ needs but developing emotional quotient, awakening self awareness and the sense of integrity and service motive is what’s going to sustain the social ecosystem in a way which will result into an overall development of the younger generation thus achieving social, economical, political development and a level playing field for every opportunity that our beautiful world has to offer.

This article is co-authored by:
CA, Suresh Prabhu, Founding Chancellor , Rishihood University; Visiting Professor at London School of Economics; Former Union Minister of Railways
Rajat Shah, Advocate; Edupreneur/Trustee, Narayani Public School; Visiting Professor of Law and Management.

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Education Through a ‘Humane’ Lens

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Picture Credits: Anipixels

Our history has traditionally embraced the importance of building relationships with animals. From an animal’s loyalty to bravery, various instances have been highlighted in historical texts and scriptures (Mahabharata and Ramayana). Many children grew up listening to stories, stories of compassion; further encouraging them to experience the human-animal bond. But in recent years, as we witness an increase in animal cruelty and pet abandonment cases, compassion seems to be at a loss today.

According to the report findings by the Federation of Indian Animal Protection Organisations (FIAPO) and All Creatures Great and Small (ACGS), between 2010-2020, a total of 4,93,910 animals were victims of crimes committed by humans. Keeping in mind that many cases go unreported, out of the 720 documented cases of crime against street animals, 20 cases were of assault by children. With nearly 50% of India’s population under the age of 25, such revelations underscore the urgent need to cultivate empathy and compassion from a young age. Humane Education, an approach that cultivates children to be empathetic and compassionate not only towards fellow beings but also all sentient beings, is an important pillar of 21st-century sensibilities. 

(Picture Credits: Peedu’s People)

“Children are human beings to whom respect is due, superior to us by reason of their innocence and of the greater possibilities of their future.”Maria Montessori

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Founded in 2021, India Animal Fund (IAF) along with NGOs like Peedu’s People; are working to ensure wholesome child development through holistic learning for school children. For young children and students to make informed and ethical choices, through humane education sessions, we introduce them to this concept via experiential, learning, observational and application learning. “Along with our partner Peedu’s People, we have delivered over 250 sessions across India. Around 10K+ children were introduced to humane education and workshops reached over 55 schools. The next steps involve expanding the programme and integrating it into the NCERT syllabus for broader reach.” says Sandeep Reddy, COO – India Animal Fund (IAF). From environmental conservation to social justice, such initiatives are crucial for creating a sustainable and equitable society. 

Another study from Science Directs indicates that children who exhibit cruelty towards animals may have witnessed or experienced family violence and are at risk of engaging in human-directed aggression during adolescence and adulthood. Implementing such programmes not only prevents violence, but also increases the likelihood of detecting and intervening early. Not only would it be beneficial for the children from K-12, if implemented in the school curriculum, via teacher training programmes, educators or schoolteachers can also be equipped with the tools and resources needed to integrate humane education into their teaching practices.

While we have animal protection laws in our country, this strategic investment may lead to a cornerstone of our educational system. By nurturing empathy and compassion among children today, we can empower the next generation to build a better world for all living beings, for them to navigate an increasingly interconnected and complex world.

Authored By-
Nidhi Gupta
Manager- Content and Communications,
India Animal Fund (IAF) 

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10 Summer Safety Tips for Kids During Summer Breaks

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Summer breaks are a much-anticipated time for children, filled with opportunities for fun, adventure, and relaxation. However, amidst the excitement, it’s crucial to prioritise safety to ensure that these experiences remain enjoyable and hazard-free. Here are some essential safety tips for kids during the summer holidays.

1. Stay Hydrated

One of the biggest risks during the summer is dehydration. Children often get so engrossed in play that they forget to drink water. Encourage your kids to drink plenty of fluids throughout the day, even if they don’t feel thirsty. Water is the best option, but natural fruit juices and milk are also good choices. Avoid sugary drinks and sodas, as they can lead to more dehydration. Teach children to recognise the signs of dehydration, such as dry mouth, dizziness, and fatigue.

2. Sun Protection

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The summer sun can be harsh, and overexposure can lead to sunburn, heat exhaustion, or even heatstroke. Ensure your children wear sunscreen with at least SPF 30, and reapply it every two hours, especially after swimming or sweating. Hats, sunglasses, and light, breathable clothing can also provide additional protection. Encourage kids to play in the shade during peak sun hours, typically between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.

3. Water Safety

Whether it’s the beach, a pool, or a lake, water activities are a summer favourite. However, they come with inherent risks. Always supervise children when they are near water. Teach them basic swimming skills and ensure they know never to swim alone. If you have a pool at home, make sure it’s fenced and that the gate is locked when not in use. Familiarise your children with water safety rules, such as not running around the pool area and recognising the significance of lifeguard instructions.

4. Bike and Scooter Safety

Cycling and scootering are popular summer activities, but they require safety precautions. Ensure your child wears a properly fitted helmet every time they ride. Elbow and knee pads can also prevent injuries in case of falls. Teach them to follow traffic rules, use bike lanes where available, and to be aware of their surroundings. Reflective clothing or accessories can make them more visible to motorists, especially during early morning or evening rides.

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5. Stranger Danger Awareness

With more time spent outdoors, it’s vital to remind children about stranger danger. Teach them not to talk to strangers or accept gifts or rides from people they don’t know. Establish a family code word that only trusted individuals know, which can be used in emergency situations. Equip your child with a mobile phone if they are old enough, and ensure they know how to use it to contact you or emergency services.

6. Safe Playgrounds

Playgrounds are fantastic places for children to burn off energy and socialise, but they must be safe environments. Check that the playground equipment is in good condition and that the surfaces are made of impact-absorbing materials like wood chips, sand, or rubber. Teach your children to play safely, avoiding pushing or shoving, and to be mindful of younger kids who may be playing nearby.

7. Insect Protection

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Summer also brings out insects like mosquitoes and ticks. These can be more than just a nuisance; they can carry diseases. Use insect repellent containing child safety approved ingridients. Dress them in long sleeves and trousers during early morning and evening when mosquitoes are most active. After outdoor activities, especially in wooded or grassy areas, check your child’s body for ticks.

8. Food Safety

With picnics and barbecues being a staple of summer, food safety is paramount. Ensure that all perishable food is kept cold until it’s time to eat. Teach your children the importance of washing their hands before handling food. Be cautious with foods that spoil easily in the heat, such as dairy products, meats, and mayonnaise-based dishes. When in doubt, throw it out – it’s better to be safe than sorry.

9. First Aid Knowledge

Accidents can happen, no matter how careful you are. Equip your children with basic first aid knowledge. Teach them how to clean and bandage a minor cut or scrape, and how to identify when they need to seek help from an adult. Make sure they know the emergency contact numbers and how to explain their location in case they need to call for help.

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10. Safe Travel

If your summer plans include travel, ensure that your child’s car seat is properly installed and that they always wear a seatbelt. During flights, remind them to stay seated and follow the crew’s instructions. Carry a small travel first aid kit and any necessary medications.

By incorporating these safety tips into your summer routine, you can help ensure that your children have a fun, healthy, and safe holiday. Summer should be a time of joy and adventure, and with a little preparation and vigilance, it can be free from mishaps and worries.

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Heatwaves Disrupt School Education Across India

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The scorching heatwaves sweeping across India have significantly impacted school education, prompting several states to take precautionary measures. Many educational institutions have either adjusted their timings or announced early summer vacations to safeguard students from the extreme weather conditions.

In Chandigarh, authorities have decided to close schools by noon, responding to a severe heatwave alert. This decision aims to protect students from the peak afternoon heat, which poses severe health risks. Similarly, Ghaziabad has closed schools for classes up to 8th grade until May 25th due to the scorching heatwave conditions.

Haryana’s Education Department issued a notice to the Deputy Commissioner concerning the closure of schools amid rising temperatures. The department’s proactive approach highlights the seriousness of the situation and the importance of ensuring student safety during such extreme weather events.

Moreover, several states have preponed their summer vacations. This decision, although disruptive to the academic calendar, is necessary to protect the well-being of students. Schools in regions like Haryana, Uttar Pradesh, and Delhi have all adjusted their schedules to accommodate the unforeseen weather challenges. The Financial Express reports that these changes are a direct response to the ongoing heatwave, which has made regular school hours untenable.

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In a notable instance, the Chandigarh administration’s move to close schools by noon is a commendable example of swift action in the face of environmental challenges. Similarly, Ghaziabad’s early closure for younger students is a preventive measure to avoid heat-related illnesses.

These disruptions have brought to light the urgent need for long-term solutions to deal with extreme weather conditions. While short-term measures like adjusting school hours and early vacations are necessary, there is a pressing need to incorporate climate resilience into educational planning. This could include infrastructural changes to schools, such as better ventilation, air conditioning, and green spaces to combat the heat. Additionally, education on climate change and its impacts should be integrated into school curriculums to raise awareness among students.

These heatwaves impacting India have led to significant changes in school operations, reflecting the need for adaptive measures in the face of climatic challenges. And this is just the beginning. So these adjustments, while disruptive, are not permanent solutions for ensuring the safety and well-being of students during extreme weather events. As India continues to face such climatic adversities, a holistic approach to climate resilience in education is imperative.

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Why Sex Education in Schools is a Battlefield: A Look into Recent Debates and the Path Forward

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Sex education in schools has once again found itself in the eye of a political storm. In the UK, Prime Minister Rishi Sunak’s recent overhaul of sex education and gender identity teachings in England’s schools has sparked intense debate. As reported by CNN, Sunak’s administration claims the changes provide much-needed clarity, but critics argue they are politically motivated and detrimental to students’ wellbeing.

The Current Debate

The newly unveiled guidelines mandate that children cannot be taught sex education before the age of nine, with explicit discussions on sexual activity delayed until age 13. Additionally, the concept of gender identity is deemed “highly contested” and is to be excluded from the curriculum. Education Secretary Gillian Keegan emphasized that teachers should impart facts rather than push agendas, a statement that has further fueled the controversy.

Pepe Di’lasio, General Secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders, criticized the move as being driven by a “political agenda at the front of a campaign season.” He pointed out the lack of substantial evidence backing the changes, suggesting they are more about garnering votes than genuinely addressing educational needs.

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The Politics of Sex Education

Sunak’s approach is seen by many as a bid to win over socially conservative voters ahead of an impending general election. This strategy has involved a series of divisive announcements, with sex education being the latest target.

Critics, including Paul Whiteman of the National Association of Head Teachers, argue that the rigid limits on discussions could drive students to seek information from unreliable sources. Sam Freedman, a senior advisor at the Ark education charity, echoed this sentiment, highlighting the educational value of discussing contested topics like gender identity in a balanced manner.

The Case for Comprehensive Sex Education

The debate over sex education isn’t limited to the UK. In India, where traditional attitudes often dominate, the need for comprehensive sex education is equally pressing. According to a 2022 survey by the Indian Journal of Community Medicine, only 20% of Indian adolescents reported receiving formal sex education. This gap leaves many young people ill-equipped to navigate their sexual health and relationships safely.

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Sex education opponents often cite cultural and moral grounds, fearing that such education might corrupt young minds. However, evidence suggests otherwise. A UNESCO report from 2018 highlighted that comprehensive sex education can lead to delayed sexual initiation, reduced risk-taking, and increased use of contraception, thereby reducing rates of unintended pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections.

Breaking the Stigma

The stigma surrounding sex education often stems from misconceptions and a lack of understanding. Addressing these misconceptions requires a multi-faceted approach:

1. Parental Involvement: Engaging parents in the dialogue around sex education can help demystify the topic and alleviate fears. Schools should offer workshops and resources to help parents understand the curriculum and its benefits.

2. Teacher Training: Educators need robust training to handle sex education topics sensitively and effectively. This includes understanding diverse perspectives and being equipped to support students’ varied needs.

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3. Evidence-Based Policies: Policymaking should be grounded in research rather than political agendas. Studies consistently show that comprehensive sex education supports better health outcomes. Policymakers must prioritize students’ long-term wellbeing over short-term political gains.

4. Community Engagement: Building community support for sex education involves transparent communication and collaboration with local leaders, healthcare professionals, and advocacy groups. Creating a community consensus can help overcome resistance and build a supportive environment for students.

A Path Forward

The controversy over sex education in schools highlights a broader issue: the tension between political agendas and educational integrity. While Sunak’s new guidelines may cater to a specific voter base, they risk undermining the comprehensive education that young people need to thrive.

In both the UK and India, breaking the stigma around sex education requires a commitment to evidence-based practices and an open, inclusive dialogue. By fostering understanding and addressing concerns head-on, we can create a more informed and healthier society.

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As we navigate these debates, it’s crucial to remember that the ultimate goal of education is to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to lead healthy, fulfilling lives. Let’s ensure that political motivations do not overshadow this fundamental objective.

(Inspired by recent analyses from CNN and BBC on UK Prime Minister Rishi Sunak’s new education guidelines)

References:
– Rob Picheta, CNN Analysis
– The Indian Journal of Community Medicine
– UNESCO Report on Comprehensive Sexuality Education (2018)

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Climate Change Erodes Education Outcomes: World Bank Report

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A new World Bank policy note reveals alarming evidence on how climate change is severely impacting education outcomes worldwide. The report highlights the increasing frequency of school closures due to extreme weather events and other climate-related factors, outlining the urgent need for adaptation measures within the education sector.

Over the past two decades, schools were closed during approximately 75 percent of extreme weather events affecting over 5 million people. It has become common for countries to close their schools multiple times a year due to heatwaves, flooding, and high pollution levels. The duration of these closures is often prolonged when school infrastructure is vulnerable or used as evacuation centres.

Climate change is also indirectly affecting students through increased diseases, stress, and conflict. The report notes that a one standard deviation change in temperature and rainfall has been linked to a 14 percent increase in the risk of intergroup conflict and interpersonal violence. These factors have severe consequences on children’s educational attainment and achievement.

The erosion of learning due to climate change translates into lower future earnings and productivity, especially for the poor. Research indicates that each additional year of schooling is associated with a 10 percent increase in earnings. As climate shocks reduce educational attainment, future earnings are likely to suffer, perpetuating cycles of poverty and limiting social mobility across generations.

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Despite these growing negative impacts, the report indicates that policymakers do not fully appreciate the urgency of climate adaptation within the education sector. A novel survey covering 94 education policymakers across 28 low- and middle-income countries reveals that nearly 61 percent ranked the protection of learning from climate change among the bottom three priorities in their country. This low prioritisation is troubling because the benefits of education are under threat.

To build resilience in education systems, policymakers must act on four fronts: education management, school infrastructure, students and teachers as change agents, and ensuring learning continuity. The report underscores the need for immediate action to adapt education systems to cope with extreme weather events.

For instance, global estimates indicate that the education sector experiences financial losses of $4 billion annually due to tropical cyclones alone. In the Philippines, over 10,000 classrooms are damaged per year due to typhoons and floods.

The World Bank’s findings stress that for millions of children who will need to attend school over the next 50 years, the results of climate mitigation will come too late. Governments must act now to increase the capacity of education systems to adapt and cope with these increasingly prevalent extreme weather events.

As climate change continues to pose severe risks to educational outcomes, it is imperative that policymakers recognise and address these challenges urgently. The future of education depends on our ability to adapt and build resilience against the adverse effects of climate change.

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Source- ANI

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Teaching Sensitivity to Kids in School: A Necessity for Today’s World

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In recent years, instances of bullying, violence, and other harmful behaviours have alarmingly increased among young children. Various factors contribute to this troubling trend. The omnipresence of social media, exposure to violent content, familial discord, and the high-pressure environment of academic and extracurricular achievements are significant reasons. These influences create an environment where children may not develop the necessary empathy and understanding to coexist harmoniously with their peers.

Given this backdrop, it is crucial to emphasise the teaching of sensitivity to children in schools. Sensitising kids towards each other, society, animals, nature, and humans in general is not just beneficial—it is imperative for fostering a more compassionate and cohesive community.

The Importance of Sensitivity

Firstly, teaching sensitivity is essential to combat bullying and violence. When children are taught to understand and appreciate the feelings and perspectives of others, they are less likely to engage in harmful behaviours. Empathy and kindness can act as powerful deterrents against bullying. Moreover, children who are sensitive to the emotions of their peers can contribute to a supportive and inclusive school environment, where everyone feels valued and respected.

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Furthermore, sensitivity towards society and the environment is crucial for nurturing responsible future citizens. Teaching children to care for animals, respect nature, and understand social issues instils a sense of responsibility and stewardship. This not only benefits the immediate community but also contributes to the broader goal of sustainable living and environmental conservation.

Implementing Sensitivity Education at the Grassroots Level in India

To effectively implement sensitivity education, a multifaceted approach is necessary, starting at the grassroots level. Here are several strategies that can be employed:

  1. Incorporate Sensitivity into the Curriculum: Schools should integrate lessons on empathy, kindness, and respect into the existing curriculum. Subjects like Social Studies and Environmental Science can include modules that teach children about the importance of sensitivity towards others and the environment. Stories, role-playing activities, and discussions can be powerful tools in this regard.
  2. Teacher Training and Development: Educators play a pivotal role in shaping the attitudes and behaviours of students. Providing teachers with training on how to foster empathy and sensitivity in the classroom is essential. Workshops and seminars can equip teachers with the skills and knowledge to create an inclusive and supportive learning environment.
  3. Extracurricular Activities and Clubs: Schools can organise clubs and activities that promote sensitivity. For instance, eco-clubs can engage students in activities like tree planting, waste management, and animal care, fostering a sense of responsibility towards nature. Similarly, social service clubs can involve students in community service projects, teaching them the importance of giving back to society.
  4. Parental Involvement: Sensitivity education should not be confined to the school environment. Encouraging parents to reinforce these values at home is crucial. Schools can organise workshops and provide resources to help parents understand their role in teaching empathy and kindness to their children.
  5. Creating a Safe and Inclusive School Environment: Schools should strive to create an environment where every student feels safe and valued. Anti-bullying policies, counselling services, and peer support programs can help achieve this. Additionally, celebrating diversity and promoting inclusivity through cultural events and awareness campaigns can enhance students’ understanding and appreciation of different perspectives.

Teaching sensitivity to children in school is not merely an optional add-on to education; it is a fundamental aspect of nurturing well-rounded individuals who can contribute positively to society. By addressing the rise in bullying and violence through empathy and understanding, we can create a more compassionate and harmonious community. Implementing sensitivity education at the grassroots level in India requires a collaborative effort from educators, parents, and the community. Together, we can ensure that our children grow up to be empathetic, responsible, and sensitive citizens, ready to make a positive impact on the world.

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Tripura Launches E-Attendance in Government Schools to Boost Accountability

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The Tripura government is set to revolutionise the management of its school system by implementing an e-attendance system across all 4,912 government schools. This digital leap, aimed at boosting transparency and accountability, is part of a broader effort to enhance educational quality and performance.

Introduced under the Vidya Samiksha Kendra initiative, which was first launched by Prime Minister Narendra Modi in Gujarat in 2022, the new system promises to improve the transparency of educational operations and school functionality. The adoption of e-attendance is expected to streamline academic monitoring and increase operational efficiency within schools.

An education department official disclosed to IANS that the implementation across all schools is projected to be completed within two years. Additionally, the integration of a geo-tagging system will facilitate online access to all essential school-related information, further enhancing the oversight capabilities of educational authorities.

The e-attendance system was previously trialled in government offices, including the civil secretariat, where it was met with positive feedback for improving administrative accountability. With 37,761 teachers currently educating 6,94,539 students across various educational levels in the state, the successful expansion of this system to schools could transform the educational landscape.

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Once fully operational, the system will allow the Chief Minister, along with other senior officials, to directly monitor the performance of teachers and schools from their offices, ensuring that educational standards are upheld across the state. This initiative is seen as a significant step forward in the government’s commitment to delivering quality education.

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CBSE Class 12 and Class 10 Results 2024: Girls Lead as Pass Rates Climb

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The Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) has today announced the results of the Class 12 and Class 10 board examinations.

In the results announced for Class 12, this year, 1,426,420 students have successfully passed the examinations, representing an overall pass rate of 87.98%, an increase of 0.65% from the previous year. The results have highlighted a significant achievement for female students, who have attained a pass rate of 91.52%, compared to 85.12% for their male counterparts, thereby outperforming them by 6.40%.

This year, approximately 39 lakh candidates registered for the CBSE Board Exams 2024 across Classes 10 and 12, with about 24 lakh of these registrations for the Class 10 exams alone. The examinations for Class 10 were conducted from February 15 to March 13, marking a crucial period for thousands of students nationwide.

Students can check their results on the official CBSE website at cbse.gov.in or other affiliated sites such as cbse.nic.in and results.cbse.nic.in.

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At ScooNews, we extend our heartfelt congratulations to all students on their results. We also want to remind everyone that marks are not the sole measure of one’s abilities or potential. For those who may feel their scores do not reflect their true capabilities, do not be disheartened. Remember, this is merely the start of a thrilling new chapter in your life.

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Shri Sanjay Kumar Chairs a Meeting on Early Childhood Care & Education (ECCE)

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In a collaborative push towards achieving the broader objectives of Early Childhood Care & Education (ECCE), Secretary of School Education & Literacy, Shri Sanjay Kumar, chaired a comprehensive meeting at the Ambedkar International Centre in New Delhi. The meeting was attended by representatives from the Ministry of Women & Child Development (MoWCD), various states, and autonomous bodies under the Department of School Education & Literacy (DoSE&L).

Setting the tone, Shri Kumar emphasised the critical role of all stakeholders in ensuring quality ECCE and commended the initiatives led by the MoWCD and states. He underscored the need for establishing three Balvatikas for children aged 3 to 6 in all CBSE and Kendriya Vidyalayas with Class 1 to ensure a seamless transition to primary education. He also advocated for co-locating Anganwadis with primary schools in rural areas through coordination with the MoWCD, aiming to provide a strong foundation in preschool education.

The group further explored the integration of Jaadui Pitara, a curated set of learning resources, into government schools offering pre-primary education. NCERT’s role in aligning the learning toys with the goals outlined in the National Curriculum Framework-Foundational Stage (NCF-FS) was highlighted. To streamline pre-primary to Class 1 transitions, the Ministry of Education and MoWCD were encouraged to link the Poshan Tracker and UDISE+ data, creating a cohesive tracking mechanism.

Brand recognition for programmes like NIPUN Bharat, Jaadui Pitara, e-Jaadui Pitara, and Vidya Pravesh was also identified as a priority to boost their visibility and impact across states. The adoption of Jaadui Pitara by state SCERTs will be supported by NCERT, ensuring compliance with designated learning outcomes.

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In the meeting, the importance of training preschool teachers and Anganwadi Workers was brought to the forefront, recognising their critical role in achieving a well-rounded ECCE framework. The session emphasised the collaboration between MoE and MoWCD to ensure transparency and efficiency through Requests for Proposals (RFPs) while procuring Jaadui Pitara materials.

With these strategies outlined, the meeting paved the way for a concerted, multi-level approach to early childhood education, striving for a seamless, inclusive, and quality experience for every child.

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Education1 day ago

What It Takes to Be Well-Educated; Not Just Well-Read

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